Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > Looking for boyfriend > Ive got to see a man about a horse

Ive got to see a man about a horse

I always heard it as " I've got to see a man about a dog". Not many horses around where I lived I suppose. And as for titbits There was a magazine in England called Titbits, a sort of gossip magazine I think. Loved reading this I, too, have heard it as "I have to see a man about a horse.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: America-A Horse With No Name Lyrics

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Goodbye Horses - Q Lazzarus

Subscribe to RSS

To see a man about a dog or horse is an English idiom, usually used as a way to apologize for one's imminent departure or absence—generally to euphemistically conceal one's true purpose, such as going to use the toilet or going to buy a drink. The original non-facetious meaning was probably to place or settle a bet on a racing dog. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud [2] in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr.

Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog. During Prohibition in the United States, the phrase was most commonly used in relation to the consumption or purchase of alcoholic beverages.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Sterling Publishing Company, Inc. The fiction is that one is going to place a bet on a dog in a race. First U. Dundurn Press Ltd. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog" meaning he needs to leave the room -- and fast.

Retrieved November 4, Time magazine. July 17, Retrieved December 29, Its claim to fame: the line "I've got to see a man about a dog. Evening Chronicle. Retrieved 9 April Categories : Figures of speech Slang Sociolinguistics. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Languages Add links. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

see a man about a horse

To see a man about a dog or horse is an English idiom, usually used as a way to apologize for one's imminent departure or absence—generally to euphemistically conceal one's true purpose, such as going to use the toilet or going to buy a drink. The original non-facetious meaning was probably to place or settle a bet on a racing dog. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud [2] in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr.

Your browser does not support the audio element. Colleague 1 : Where are you going?

Top definition. See a man about a horse unknown. It means to politely excuse yourself from a situation to go to the restroom or buy a drink. It originated from men disappearing to go bet on horse or dog races.

Going to see a man about a horse

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. It seems possibly to be a humorous way to get out of a conversation. Even as a native English speaker, I've never figured out the exact situation you would use this phrase. It almost sounds like it may have once been a punchline to a joke in a movie or something. Wikipedia actually has an article dedicated to this phrase. It says:. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog. Used as an excuse for leaving without giving the real reason especially if the reason is to go to the toilet, or to have a drink.

See a man about a dog

.

.

.

see-a-man-about-a-horse

.

.

.

I've just got to see a man about a horse. (slang, idiomatic, euphemistic) A message signaling one needs to go missing for a short while, for any reason, without.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Comments: 1
  1. Vibar

    I congratulate, excellent idea and it is duly

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.